The Godhead Revealed

(The following account is a narrative of the event recorded in Matthew 3:13-17, John 1:31-34 KJV).

As a crowd of Jews stood watching, Jesus stepped into the Jordan River to be baptized. He had traveled from Galilee to where John the Baptist was preaching and baptizing. At thirty years of age, Jesus was ready to begin His public ministry and to fulfill His divine purpose on earth. As He waded out into the water, John began to protest: “I am not worthy to baptize you.” Yet, God had appointed John to introduce the Messiah to the world.Read more

The Nature of God

For in him [God] we live, and move, and have our being; as certain also of your own poets have said, For we are also his offspring. Forasmuch then as we are the offspring of God, we ought not to think that the Godhead is like unto gold, or silver, or stone, graven by art and man’s device. — Acts 17:28-29

It is only because of God that we have breath and strength, for He is the Fountain of Life. It is only because of God that we have peace, salvation, and hope of eternal life. As the offspring of God—living and intelligent beings—we must not relegate the Godhead to an inanimate object created by man but recognize that the Godhead is more excellent than the creation and worthy of worship.Read more

Bible Study – The Trinity

Scripture Reading: For there are three that bear record in heaven, the Father, the Word [Jesus], and the Holy Ghost: and these three are one. —1 John 5:7

Summary: There is one and only one God, eternally existent in the union of three persons—Father, Son, and Holy Spirit. While these persons are distinct from one another in individuality and function, they are one in essence and nature.

Definition: The Trinity, formed from the words “tri” and “unity,” describes the state of being threefold and yet one. It is the theological term employed to signify the doctrine of God the Father, God the Son, and God the Holy Spirit being three coexistent, coeternal persons and yet one God.Read more

The Triune Godhead

The Bible clearly teaches that there is only one true and living God who is the creator of the universe—eternal, almighty, unchangeable, infinitely powerful, wise, just and holy. At the same time, it teaches that the Father is God, that Jesus is God, and that the Holy Spirit is God. This relationship of one God in three distinct, divine persons is theologically termed the Trinity.

The Mystery of the Trinity

While the word Trinity is not found in the Scripture, the concept it represents exists. The ONE God is composed of three coexistent, coeternal, coequal, and co-powerful persons who are one in spirit, purpose, duration, and nature, yet three in individuality, mind, and function.Read more

Individual Roles of the Trinity

“THE FATHER CREATES A PLAN,
JESUS CHRIST IMPLEMENTS THE PLAN,
AND THE HOLY SPIRIT ADMINISTERS THE PLAN.”

The Father, Son, and Holy Spirit are unified together as God and function in harmony in the universe as well as in the lives of mankind. While the members of the Godhead have common goals and purpose, as well as  shared attributes and functions, each person of the Trinity also has unique roles and responsibilities.

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Attributes of God

The first chapter of the Bible opens with “In the beginning God….” The Word reveals to mankind the attributes and characteristics that God Himself chose to share with us. His design, will, and judgments bring clarity and purpose. Life is made fuller and richer as we learn and understand more about the nature of God.

God Is . . .

Immaterial

God is not fundamentally composed of matter.

“God is a Spirit.” —John 4:24Read more

What Is the Hypostatic Union?

What is the hypostatic union?

Jesus Christ is one person with two natures—divine and human. The hypostatic union describes this union of Christ’s humanity and divinity in one hypostasis, or individual existence. Jesus is God in the flesh. “In the beginning was the Word [Jesus], and the Word [Jesus] was with God, and the Word [Jesus] was God…. and the Word [Jesus] was made flesh, and dwelt among us” (John 1:1,14). Jesus had two natures—God and man. He was not part God and part man but fully God and fully man. Jesus never lost His divinity but existed on the earth as God coupled with a human nature.Read more

Nontrinitarian Denominations

Various Christian denominations are nontrinitarian and reject the doctrine of the Trinity. While in the minority, the two largest nontrinitarian denominations are The Church of Christ of Latter-day Saints (Mormons) and Jehovah’s Witnesses.

Jehovah’s Witnesses consider Jesus to have had a beginning and to be a direct creation of God. They do not believe that the Holy Spirit is a person but God’s active force. Mormonism teaches that God created Christ and that the Godhead is a divine council of the three individual gods. This is a form of tritheism rather than the Biblical monotheistic teaching.

Let Me See Jesus Only

And when they had lifted up their eyes, they saw no man, save Jesus only. —Matthew 17:8

Jesus, on the mount of transfiguration, communed with Moses and Elijah—Moses represented the law, Elijah the prophets, and Jesus the new dispensation of grace. In His awe and enthusiasm, Peter offered to make three tabernacles, one for each of them. A bright cloud overshadowed them and the Father spoke: “This is my beloved Son, in whom I am well pleased; hear ye Him” (v5). In fear, the disciples fell on their faces. When they lifted up their eyes, they saw no man save Jesus only.Read more

Excerpts From the Christian Legacy of A cappella Music in Divine Worship

By Harlan Sorrell

Instrumental music was not introduced into so-called Christian worship until late in the Roman Catholic apostasy, and even then, the Catholic Church accepted it reluctantly. The Greek Orthodox Church never accepted mechanical instruments into their worship at all, and it is evident that the Protestant reformers removed them from worship.

The word a cappella is an Italian word, coming from two Latin words, a meaning “according to,” and cappella meaning “chapel.” Webster defines a cappella thus: “In the style of church or chapel music; especially in the old style, without accompaniment.” It is a fact of history that this was the style of church music from apostolic times.

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