Blind Guides

From the writings of Tertullian circa 210 AD: “So long as you deem yourself a Christian, you are a different man from a pagan. Give him back his own views of things! After all, he does not himself learn from your views. Why lean upon a blind guide if you have eyes of your own? Why be clothed by one who is naked if you have put on Christ?”

Corrupt Deacons

The Shepherd of Hermas (c. 150 A.D.) wrote concerning corrupt deacons:

“They that have spots are the deacons that exercised their office ill and plundered the livelihood of widows and orphans and made gains for themselves from the ministrations they had received to perform” (Sim., IX, 26).

Did You Know?

Among the Jews, “At the ordination of the president of the synagogue there were always three presbyters present to lay on hands, so the early Church canons required three bishops to be present at the consecration of a bishop” [Jamieson-Fausset-Brown on 1 Timothy 4:14].

Prayer Beads

Prayer beads are used by many religions throughout the world, such as Hinduism, Buddhism, Christianity, Islam, Sikhism, etc. to mark the repetitions of prayers, chants or devotions. The English word “bead” comes from an Old English word “bede” which means prayer. While their origin remains uncertain, prayer beads seemed be used in some fashion by pagan civilizations over 36 centuries ago. Their earliest verified, recorded historical use dates back to Hinduism, hundreds of years before Christ.

Jesus taught His disciples not to pray like the heathen who use vain repetitions. Prayer is an opening of the heart to God, not rote memorization and repetition. The use of prayer beads is not in conformity to the teachings of Christ.

Lifting Holy Hands

Prior to the instruction concerning women’s modesty and behavior in 1 Timothy 2:9 (which many individuals advocating holiness accept), Paul states to the men that: “I will therefore that men pray every where, lifting up holy hands, without wrath and doubting.”